Lion Hunting

Take a tour.

Trophy Animals

Find more bird species under our trophy animals

Wildebeest Hunting

The wildebeest or gnu, as it is also known, is one tough antelope when it comes to absorbing lead.

Bubye Valley

One of the Largest in Africa.

Zimbabwe Hunting Season

Zimbabwe, a landlocked country in the Southern part of Africa and is Home to one of the Seven Wonders of the World, The Victoria Falls. It has the largest man made lake in the world, Lake Kariba. Second only to Botswana (133 000) Zimbabwe boasts a population of approximately 68 000 Elephant.  It is estimated that more than half of this population lives in The Hwange National Park, Once the royal hunting ground of the Zulu warrior King Mzilikazi.  Hwange, roughly the size of Wales. With varied topography and vegetation from Lush Teake forests in the east to arid semi-desert in the west. Hwange has amongst the highest diversity of mammals of any National Park in the world with over 108 mammal species, over 400 types of bird and 100 species of tree and shrub giving it an edge over other regional safari destinations.

Zimbabwe Info Map

Zimbabwe is divided into three main hunting areas. Government  (Link to National Parks paragraph) areas, Rural or Communal (Link to Communal paragraph) areas, and Private (Link to Private Land paragraph) hunting areas. Depending on the location of the area you are hunting, you could expect a 3-6 hours drive from the airport of arrival into camp. However, chartering a light aircraft into many of the hunting camps is also an option and allows for time to absorb the beauty of the diverse habitat Zimbabwe has to offer. From mostly Mopane forest to the dry scrub of the Acasia, grassy savannah and the steep valleys of the Zambezi escarpment.

Zimbabwe has no set-hunting season, but conservation is an intricate part of the survival of Zimbabwe’s wildlife. We work in line with the ZPHGA (link to zphga.org) in conjunction with the Zimbabwe National Parks (link to Parks and Wild Life Act) to pay close attention to Quota regulation. Quota is relevant to the number of species in any of our legal hunting areas. Positive management of these areas allow for good ecological balance between the wildlife and their habitat.

  • Hunting Season - January through December (all year round)
  • Due to the rains and location of many hunting areas, January through March can be very wet, thick and muddy. Most hunting is conducted from April through October. June through August are the most popular months for hunting safaris due to the cooler temperatures.
  • Depending on the nature of your Safari, hunts generally last 7, 10, 14, 18 and 21 days respectfully. However, there is no rule as to duration of a Safari. These days are a guideline measured over years of experience and set to ensure you get the best opportunity to acquire your trophy.

 

Non-Hunting Areas in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe National Parks

(link to Parks and Wild Life Act)

These areas are administrated by The National Parks and wildlife Management Authority (PWMA). These areas include Hwange, The Zambezi, Mana Pools and Gona re Zhou. These areas are set aside only for the preservation of wildlife. No hunting in these areas is permitted.

Regulated Hunting Areas in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe National Parks Safari Areas

(link to Parks and Wild Life Act)

These areas are controlled and administrated by Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (PWMA). These Safari areas are situated in more remote marginal areas, unsuitable for agriculture due to lack of rainfall and Trypanosomiasis disease. Thus making the areas ideal for game and hunting operations on a sustainable off-take basis. These areas include The Deka Safari area, Matetsi Units, Chewore, Chirisa, Chete, Makuti, Tuli, to name a few. These areas comprise of Park and Wildlife estate, and they primarily have hunting on them. Forestry areas may also be included into this category.

  • Hunting may commence from 1st half an hour before sunrise into the last half hour after sunset.
  • Hunting is not permitted after dark
  • The use of aircraft, electronic callers, night vision scopes or the use of any artificial light to assist in a safari are not permitted
  • Hunting from a vehicle is not permitted, however a vehicle may be used to reach the area from where the hunt may be conducted on foot.
  • Shooting from a vehicle is not permitted. A person hunting an animal need to be no less than 55 yards (50 meters) from the vehicle before making the shot.
  • Animals may not be chased or driven by a vehicle.
  • Hunting is not permitted within 440 yards (400 meters) of any designated point of water.
  • Hunting with dog(s) is not permitted.
  • Handguns are permitted for the use of a back up but not for the actual hunt.
  • Bow-hunting is not permitted.

Communal (tribal) Land

Communal (tribal) Lands are traditionally held by indigenous people. Generally heavily populated with limited, if any, resident wildlife. (Exceptions where Safari Operators have created reserves within the communal area in cooperation with the locals) Local District Councils assume the responsibility for the management and utilization of the wildlife in these areas under authority from the Government. With assistance from National Parks (PWMA) the council decides on a sustainable annual quota of animals to be hunted and offers them to safari (hunting) operators on a tender basis. The funds generated from these areas are used to assist and develop the district. This scheme is known as CAMPFIRE (Communal Areas management Plan For Indigenous Resources).

  • Within the parameters of various wildlife protection laws, the safari operator sets the standard for what he considers ethical hunting.
  • Hours of hunting on designated Communal (tribal) Land, is not regulated but generally takes place during the daylight hours.
  • The use of electronic callers, night vision scopes as well as any form of artificial light is permitted to conduct a hunt after dark. Hunting is allowed at night for nocturnal species such as Lion, Leopard, Bushpig, etc.
  • Hunting with a handgun is permitted.
  • Bow-hunting is permitted. (link to bow permit paragraph)

Private Land

Private Land is owned by an individual. Hunting quotas are based on what the landowner deems appropriate and is subject to the approval of the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (PWMA).

  • The landowner sets the standard of what he considers ethical hunting within the parameters of various wildlife protection laws. The safari operator may also apply his own standard in addition to the landowner, if not the same person.
  • Hunting with dogs for cats (a special hunting permit using dogs is required US$ 500)
  • The use of electronic callers, night vision scopes as well as any form of artificial light is permitted to conduct a hunt after dark. Hunting is allowed at night for nocturnal species such as Lion, Leopard, Bushpig, etc at the discretion of the landowner.
  • Hunting with a handgun is permitted.
  • Bow-hunting is permitted. (link to bow permit paragraph)

Zimbabwe Hunting Areas Map and Satellite Imagery

Climate in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe’s climate is greatly varied by altitude. There is a dry season, including a short cool season from May to September when the whole country has very little rain. The rainy season is typically from November through March. This is also our summer period and temperatures can range between a hot and humid 40ºc-50ºc and drop to a warm 28º c in the lowveld. Averages of 34º-35º c in the west of Zimbabwe, Kariba, and The Victoria Falls maxing to a 39ºc. The higher regions of Zimbabwe, experience a much higher rainfall and cooler averages of 25ºc in the east. Respectfully, temperatures can drop drastically to lows of 14ºc – 10ºc.

World Weather On Line  (ACU Weather?)provides a very detailed look at current weather conditions, weather forecasts, a history and almanac for predicting average weather conditions during the time while you will be traveling in that part of the world. Click here for Zimbabwe's climate and temperature forecast.

Species to Hunt in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe offers a good selection of species for trophy hunting, including Elephant, Buffalo, Lion, Leopard and a multitude of plains game species.

ZIMBABWE Species to Hunt

These species may be available on the hunting license; however they may not be available on quota for the particular area you are hunting in. Individual hunting operators may or may not be given a quota for that animal, or have a remaining licenses for some species.

Please note that some of the animal species you choose to hunt may not be able to be imported back into your country of residence. You can find information on the importation of sport hunted trophies at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service at Permits or the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) at Cites.

Zimbabwe Hunting Trophy Export/Import Restrictions

American Clients Only

As of the 4th April 2014, USF&W announced a suspension on imports of sport-hunted African elephant trophies taken in Zimbabwe during calendar year 2014. The Service was to re-evaluate this suspension for 2015 or upon receipt of new information that demonstrates an improved situation for elephants in this country but this suspension remains in place.

Bird Hunting Season in Zimbabwe

Bird Hunting Season - January 1st to December 31st (all year round) however the better time of the year for a wing shooting experience in combination with your hunting safari would be between May and September. A hunter will need to request from his safari operator a Bird hunting license by species. This Bird hunting license allows you to harvest all of the different huntable species of birds listed. This list is not yet available and quotas per bird species should be discussed with your hunting outfitter.

When it comes to wing shooting, several species of Duck, Geese, Partridge also referred to as Francolin, Guineafowl, Pigeon, Dove and Quail are available for hunting.

Bird hunting fees vary from safari operators and by species.

Shot Placement Guide for the Perfect Shot

Click here to visit our shot placement guide, the most comprehensive shot placement guide of African game online.

Bow-hunting in Zimbabwe

Bow and handgun hunting are permitted on an experimental basis, but require special permits. Black powder is legal provided the weapon complies with the requirements of the Third Schedule of the Firearms Act. This also applies to handguns.

Bow-hunting plains game in Zimbabwe started in 1989 when the government began allowing bow-hunting under special exception of the law. In 1999 the government of Zimbabwe officially opened bow-hunting under new legislation.

Bow-hunting in Zimbabwe may only take place on Alienated (private) Land or Communal (tribal) Land. Bow-hunting is illegal in Zimbabwe on National Parks Safari Areas.

Bow-hunting Class A Game (Elephant, Buffalo and Hippo) is not permitted in Zimbabwe unless a special bow-hunting permit for those species has been granted by the general director of the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (PWMA) for which the safari operator must apply for well prior to the start of the bow hunt.

General plains game bow-hunting in the country at present leaves somewhat to be desired. There are a few isolated locations that are still acceptable but not the quality that there used to be.

Zimbabwe offers a few isolated plains game areas that are still relatively good for bow-hunting but not the quality that there used to be. The country however has great dangerous game hunting safaris by bow, however few operators have the experience to conduct bow-hunting safaris, so careful selection of the hunting outfitter is very important.

Zimbabwe does not have an additional bow qualification for professional hunters, however a professional guide or professional hunter licensed and registered with the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA) is required to be present during the hunt to guide and protect the hunting client.

For bow-hunting in Zimbabwe, I recommend the later part of the season as it is more suited to bow-hunting because it is drier May through the end of September in most parts of the country.

Importation of Bows & Arrows into Zimbabwe

It is legal for hunters to import bows for bow-hunting purposes into Zimbabwe and just as with a rifle, a special hunting permit is required at a cost of US$ 1,500.

Minimum Equipment Requirements for Bow-hunting in Zimbabwe

  • Class A Game
    Bow Kinetic Energy 80 ft/lbs
    Arrow Weight 700 grain
    (Elephant, Hippo, Buffalo)
  • Class B Game
    Bow Kinetic Energy 77 ft/lbs
    Arrow Weight 695 grain
    Broadheads with only two cutting edges
    (Lion, Giraffe, Eland)
  • Class C Game
    Bow Kinetic Energy 70 ft/lbs
    Arrow Weight 618 grain
    (Leopard, Crocodile, Kudu, Oryx / Gemsbok, Hartebeest, Wildebeest, Zebra, Nyala, Sable Antelope, Waterbuck, Tsessebe, etc.)
  • Class D Game
    Bow Kinetic Energy 56 ft/lbs
    Arrow Weight 463 grain
    (Warthog, Impala, Reedbuck, Sitatunga, Duiker, Steenbok, Jackal, Game Birds, etc.)

Bow-hunting in Zimbabwe may only be done with compound bows. Bow-hunting with recurve bows, longbows or crossbows is not permitted in Zimbabwe unless a special permit has been issued for which the safari operator must apply for six months prior to the start of the bow hunt. This special bow-hunting permit comes at a substantial cost.

Minimum Equipment Requirements for Rifle Hunting in Zimbabwe

  • Class A Game
    5300 Joule
    Minimum caliber 9.2mm in diameter
    (Elephant, Hippo, Buffalo)
  • Class B Game
    4300 Joule
    Minimum caliber 7.0mm in diameter
    (Lion, Giraffe, Eland)
  • Class C Game
    3000 Joule
    Minimum caliber 7.0mm in diameter
    (Leopard, Crocodile, Kudu, Oryx / Gemsbok, Hartebeest, Wildebeest, Zebra, Nyala, Sable Antelope, Waterbuck, Tsessebe, etc.)
  • Class D Game
    850 Joule
    Minimum caliber 5.56mm in diameter
    (Warthog, Impala, Reedbuck, Sitatunga, Duiker, Steenbok, Jackal, Game Birds, etc.)
  • Black Powder Rifles
    Minimum caliber .40

Traveling with Firearms & Ammunition

Traveling to Africa usually requires taking at least a couple of different airlines as well as departing from several countries whose laws and regulations are constantly changing. And they all have their own rules, regulations and laws for which it is your responsibility to be aware and in compliance with all of them..

Firearm Import Regulations For Zimbabwe

Application for a temporary firearm import permit for Zimbabwe can be made on arrival at the port of entry.

There is NO FEE for issuing a firearm permit.

  • Handguns can be imported as a back up on a normal hunt or as a primary hunting arm. No handgun hunting is allowed on Parks estate but is fine on tribal land or on Save Conservancy. It's recommended to get a handgun permit in advance via your outfitter.
  • Automatic firearms are prohibited and it is inadvisable to bring semi-automatic firearms into Zimbabwe.
  • A maximum of 100 ROUNDS of ammunition per firearm is allowed

Please Note:

According to EU Regulation (EC) No 314/2004 (Article 14 Annex 1, Item 12) the importation of firearms and ammunition, including those for hunting/sporting purposes, from the E.U. into Zimbabwe is prohibited. European and British airlines will not carry firearms of any kind on flights direct to Zimbabwe. If you want to take firearms into Zimbabwe and you are flying from an EU country, it will be necessary to get 2 sets of tickets issued - one set for Johannesburg and another set for the onward flight to Zimbabwe.

The above includes the Netherlands who will not permit hunters with firearms to transit who are ticketed to Zimbabwe .

Canada has also implemented a ban on all firearms going to Zimbabwe, which includes hunting firearms. Go to Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada for full details.

The US Travel Advisory states:

  • U.S. citizens who are temporarily carrying firearms and ammunition into Zimbabwe for purposes of hunting, and who cannot qualify for an exemption under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), may need an approved temporary export license (DSP73) from Department of State's Office of Defense Trade Controls.

You will need to clear the firearms in RSA, so will need to complete the RSA firearm import procedure. There will be no interline handling of firearms in this situation.

To speed up your airport firearm import process in Zimbabwe, download Zimbabwe Firearm Permit Application Form Page 1 and Zimbabwe Firearm Permit Application Form Page 2

PRINT PAGE 2 ON REVERSE OF PAGE 1 AND MAKE TRIPLICATE COPIES

Permits & Importation of Firearms & Ammunition into Zimbabwe

The following section contains the basic information you will need to know.

  • Temporary importation of firearms and ammunition into Zimbabwe is free of charge and the process is quick and easy.
  • Hunters entering Zimbabwe with firearm(s) and ammunition must complete in duplicate a Certificate To Possess Firearms Form F.R. 20 for all firearm(s) and/or ammunition in their possession. Click here to print a copy of this form, we would strongly recommend that you fill out the form in duplicate beforehand, leaving them unsigned and carry it with you to Zimbabwe, along with a third copy for yourself. Your hunting outfitter does not need to receive a copy of this form.
  • This application form F.R. 20 must be submitted upon entry while declaring your firearm(s) and ammunition at the customs hall of the airport, where your temporary import/export permit will be issued.
  • A maximum of one hundred (100) rounds of ammunition may be imported per hunting rifle, however you may encounter greater restrictions from the airline(s) you are traveling on or country you are departing from or other countries you may be visiting or transiting through.
  • Only ammunition for the specific caliber(s) you are bringing may be imported.
  • Importation of over three hundred (300) rounds of ammunition will require a special permit to be obtained by the safari operator well prior to the start of the hunting safari.
  • There is no limit to the number of firearms that may be imported into Zimbabwe for trophy hunting purposes, however if traveling through South Africa a maximum of two firearms are allowed even if you are just in transit. Some European countries also have greater limitation than Zimbabwe as to the number of firearms which can be brought into their country even while in transit.
  • Black powder rifles are allowed with a minimum caliber .40 for hunting purposes, however it is illegal to transport on commercial airlines black powder and percussion caps. Contact your safari hunting operator to organize for it well prior to your hunt as it may need to be special ordered.
  • Handguns are allowed for hunting purposes in some Communal (tribal) Land and Alienated (private) Land but not permitted in National Parks Safari Areas. A special hunting permit which the safari operator must apply for a couple of months prior to the start of the hunt can be requested with the general director of the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA). This special handgun permit comes at a cost, US$ 1,500.
  • No automatic or semi-automatic firearms are allowed, except a semi-automatic shotgun for bird hunting purposes.
  • No weapons which fall under military categories.
  • No crossbows, recurve or longbows are allowed. A special permit which the safari operator must apply for six months prior to the start of the bow hunt can be requested. This special bow-hunting permit comes at a substantial cost.

Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association (ZPHGA)

Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association (ZPHGA) is dedicated to maintain the highest standards of professionalism amongst their members and are committed to the long term management and utilization of wildlife. However it is important to mention that Zimbabwe's hunting outfitters, hunting guides, master hunting guides, bowhunting guides and professional hunters are not required to be members of ZPHGA to conduct hunting safaris. Click here to visit ZPHGA web site for more information regarding basic hunting laws and regulations and more.

Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association (ZPHGA)

Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association (ZPHGA) is dedicated to maintain the highest standards of professionalism amongst their members and are committed to the long term management and utilization of wildlife. However it is important to mention that Zimbabwe's hunting outfitters, hunting guides, master hunting guides, bowhunting guides and professional hunters are not required to be members of ZPHGA to conduct hunting safaris. Click here to visit ZPHGA web site for more information regarding basic hunting laws and regulations and more.

Safari operators in Zimbabwe are required to be registered and licenced by the Zimbabwe Tourism Authority. Ask for your Operator's number when booking your hunt and, if he does not have one, check his bona fides through SOAZ by emailing them at the following: soaz@mweb.co.zw.

Operators must hold a lease or agreement on a suitable concession with an approved quota of animals. They are responsible for the official paperwork and permits connected to the hunt.

Bow and handgun hunting are permitted on an experimental basis, but require special permits. Black powder is legal provided the weapon complies with the requirements of the Third Schedule of the Firearms Act. This also applies to handguns.

Hunting operators are required by law to provide the services of a Zimbabwe Licenced Professional Hunter to accompany foreign hunters in Zimbabwe. Licencing is undertaken by the National Parks & Wildlife Authority. Professional Hunters write a Learner Examination, and are then apprenticed to a fully-licenced Professional Hunter for two years. During this time they must pass a shooting test set by the Zimbabwe Shooting Federation and obtain an Advanced First Aid Certificate.

They then attend a Proficiency Test in the field. Full Licence holders carry a plastic disc issued by the Parks Authority which shows their photograph, ID number and licence number. Learner Licence holders carry a paper licence with their details and a licence number.

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA)

A hunt must be organized and carried out by a safari operator that is registered and licensed with the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA). Safari operator are obliged by law to employ a licensed professional guide or professional hunter to accompany hunting clients into the bush. To visit Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority web site click here.

Zimbabwe Hunting Permits & Licenses

Zimbabwe defines three categories of land where hunting is permitted; National Parks Safari Areas, Communal (tribal) Land and Alienated (private) Land. Hunting in Zimbabwe is on a sustainable use basis with quotas issued annually. Quotas for protected species such as Elephant, Crocodile (ranch Crocodile are exempt), Leopard and Cheetah are granted by CITES annually.

The Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA) allocates quotas by species to each National Parks Safari Areas on an individual basis. Local District Councils allocates their own quotas by species to their Communal (tribal) Land on an individual basis. Landowners allocate their own quotas by species to their Alienated (private) Land on an individual basis.

Your hunting license and permit will be applied for and obtained by your hunting safari operator well prior to your arrival, please check with your safari operator as to the current charges or if the cost of this paperwork is already included in the price of your hunt.

The following is required for trophy hunting in Zimbabwe:

  • The government of Zimbabwe strictly controls the minimum fees that a safari operator can charge before trophies can be exported, thus to prevent undervaluing wildlife and limit the amount of money that safari operators can hide to the government.
  • A safari operator can set his prices above and beyond the government's set minimum fees.
  • Safari operators often sell hunts below the government's set minimum fees for trophies that are not exported.
  • There is no limit as to the number of species a hunter may harvest as long as the safari hunting operator has the hunting rights.
  • The hunting outfitter may impose their own guidelines as to the minimum number of days required to hunt certain species or combination of species.
  • Permits (TR2) must be issued prior to the hunt commencing, the TR2 permit must be completed in full by the safari operator. The TR2 permit is essentially an authority to hunt, a declaration of what was harvested during the hunt, a banking form and an export application permit.
  • Signed and stamped TR2 permits are issued by the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA) only.
  • Prior to the commencement of the safari, the hunter should look at the TR2 permit to verify that the professional hunter and safari operator listed on the TR2 permit are the ones that he will be hunting with.
  • The TR2 permit must be signed by the hunter and professional guide or professional hunter at the end of the hunting safari.
  • The hunter should make note of the TR2 permit serial number for future reference with the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA) should a problem occur during the exportation process of the trophies.
  • A separate permit must be issued for each individual hunting client.
  • A hunt must be organized and carried out by a safari operator that is registered and licensed.
  • A licensed and registered professional guide or professional hunter must conduct all hunting.

CITIES Permits & U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The importation of some individual sport hunted trophies requires a CITES permit (i.e. African Elephant, White Rhinoceros and Leopard to name a few), you will need to submit an application to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service if you are planning to import any of the species on their list. You can download the CITIES permit application forms by clicking here. CITES stands for Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, visit their web site at Cites.

Camouflage

The use of Military style Camouflage clothing is not allowed in Zimbabwe. However during the actual hunt camouflage is permitted. We would strongly advise that it only be worn during your hunt and not in town or for travel as this may land you in trouble. For excellent quality camouflage, you need look no further than KUIU

How to Get There

A majority of international hunting clients will fly directly from their country of origin into South Africa on a major international airline, many of which offer a route to Johannesburg (Tambo International Airport - JNB). This route then require a short flight to get to Zimbabwe's capital Harare. Direct flights into Harare are available on through London several days a week however it is important to note that firearms and ammunition will be allowed. If you want to take firearms into Zimbabwe and you are flying from an European country, it will be necessary to get 2 sets of tickets issued, one set for Johannesburg and another set for the onward flight to Zimbabwe.

For destinations not servicing Harare directly, Air Zimbabwe runs regular internal flights between the capital Harare and Bulawayo and Victoria Falls.

International Airport in Zimbabwe

  • City: Harare - capital of Zimbabwe
    Harare International Airport
    Airport Code HRE
    Located 7 miles (12km) southeast of the city of Harare

Major Airlines Flying into Zimbabwe

Air Zimbabwe - Logo
South African Airways - Logo
British Airways - Logo
Delta - Logo
Lufthansa (Germany) - Logo

There is no limit as to the amount of foreign currency that a visitor can import into Zimbabwe, however the importation of Zimbabwe Dollar (ZD) is limited to US$50,000. There is no limit regarding the export of foreign currency as long as the visitor declares the foreign currency on an official declaration form (Form 47) when entering Zimbabwe. If no official declaration of the funds was made upon entry into the country, visitors departing Zimbabwe will only be allowed to export up to US$ 1,000 or risk having the money confiscated and/or being prevented from leaving the country pending a court appearance.

Information provided by the Safaris Operators Association of Zimbabwe (SOAZ):

Please be advised that upon arrival in Zimbabwe, you will be required to fill out a Currency Declaration Form to state how much currency you are bringing into Zimbabwe. You will be given a copy. Upon departure you will be required to show the copy. You already do a similar procedure with your weapons coming in and out of the country.

The Currency Declaration is apparently to stop what the authorities believe to be a loophole whereby Operators are trying to get clients to take out money for them. Since in the current economic climate the Operators are seldom in a position to send out large sums of money, this is erroneous, but arguing with authorities is a dead-end.

The best thing is to advise you of what is likely to be asked of you and to re-assure you that you are not about to be arrested or anything else dramatic. You are perfectly safe- just try not to lose your copy of the Declaration Form until you leave the country.

Visa & Travel Documents

All foreigners must be in possession of a passport that will remain valid for at least six months after the intended date of departure from Zimbabwe as well as a round trip airline ticket.

Temporary entry visas for Zimbabwe are required by visitors from almost all countries. As the list changes from time to time, it is important to verify if you need to obtain a visa based upon your country of citizenship. Entry visas must be obtain prior to arrival in the country by visitors from certain countries, for some. The cost of the visa depends upon the nationality of the applicant and whether it is for a single entry or multiple entries. This should be done well in advance as it can take some time to complete the process which may require sending your passport to their Embassy or Consulate. Entry visa rules can change from time to time, it is important to verify the current regulations before obtaining a visa.

To find out if you need to apply for a Visa in advance, a great resource with free information is Travel Document System (TDS) at www.traveldocs.com. If you are in need of a visa, Travel Document System is nationally recognized as a leading authority in the field of international Travel Documents. Travelers are quite often not sure of the specific requirements or documentation required to enter into a foreign country. TDS helps international travelers easily understand what is specifically required of them in order to gain passage into another country and provides visa services for U.S. citizens to most countries for which an entry visa is required www.traveldocs.com.

Traveler's Health & Immunizations

No vaccinations or International Health Certificate are required to enter Zimbabwe, however we suggest that you visit the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) for their recommendations for travel in Zimbabwe.

CDC recommends that you see a health-care provider who specializes in Travel Medicine. Find a travel medicine clinic near you by clicking here. If you have a medical condition, you should also share your travel plans with any doctors you are currently seeing for other medical reasons.

Recommended Vaccinations Include:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Typhoid
  • Rabies
  • Routine vaccination if you are not up-to-date including Influenza, Polio, MMR (measles/mumps/rubella) and DPT (diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus)

Malaria prophylactics medication is highly recommended and should be considered as mandatory, however we suggest that you visit the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) for their recommendations for travel in Zimbabwe as mosquitoes in this country are resistant to some antimalarial drugs.

The CDC is most credible online resource for up to date health information. Click here to visit the section dedicated to Traveler's Health specific to Zimbabwe. Information about vaccinations, diseases, prevention, tips and much more can be found here.

hunting-zimbabwe

Malaria Map of Zimbabwe

Click here to enlarge Zimbabwe malaria map.

Malaria Maps Of Africa

Malaria Maps of Africa

Click here for Africa malaria maps, distribution model, endemic / epidemic risk areas, duration of malaria transmission season and duration of malaria transmission season.

Travel Advisory from The U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs

What you should know before you go. You may obtain international travel information by country, warnings for travelers about crime and public announcements about travel abroad in addition to so much other valuable information click here.

Tourism in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe Official Government Tourism web site is a good place to explore what options are available for travel outside of your hunting safari, click here. Your hunting safari outfitter may also offer short excursions up to extensive touring through their company as well.

 General Information about Zimbabwe

  • Republic of Zimbabwe
  • Population 11,400,000
  • Capital City Harare (1,500,000)
  • Languages English (official), Shona, Sindebele and numerous tribal dialects
  • Official Currency Zimbabwe Dollar (ZD). Denominations in 50,000, 20,000, 10,000, 5,000, 1,000, 500, 100, 50, 20, 10, 5, 1, 0.05 and 0.01 TZ bank notes. To view images of these banknotes, click here.
  • Electricity, the Zimbabwean standard is 220/240 volts, three-pin 15 amp outlets. Most lodges/camps have generator(s) to power the electricity through rechargeable batteries therefore it is recommended to bring a small power inverter that plugs into a cigarette lighter to invert 12V DC Power to 110V AC for recharging in the hunting vehicle. Generator(s) in most camps are only run during the morning and evening hours and sometimes can be run at other times by special request. Be sure to check with your hunting outfitter in Zimbabwe what they are using. Click here for more info.
  • Country Dialing Code 263

Click here for more information about Zimbabwe from the CIA World Factbook which supplies a multitude of facts about Zimbabwe.

Official Government Web Site Of The Republic Of Zimbabwe

Click here

Clothing

This extensive packing list is very complete and should be used as a guide to help you with your preparation. Adapt this list according to your preferences, weather and length of your trip, etc.

Safari hunting wear should be comfortably fitting and made of a sturdy fabric. Laundry is done on a daily basis so packing should be done with this in mind. The color of your hunting clothes from hats to boots including your backpack should be green, brown, khaki, olive, or neutral. Avoid light shades of any color and clothing that makes noise. Depending upon the time of the year, darker colored clothing might be recommended.

I recommend layering clothing since temperature changes from dawn to dusk relevant to the area and time of year you are conducting your hunt in Zimbabwe. You should test your layers before your trip, your outer layer should fit easily over the inside one(s) without binding and bunching up. Do not bring clothing items that you are very fond of, the African bush is unforgiving. Should you be traveling during the rainy season it is best to have at least some fast drying synthetic clothing that maintains its warmth when wet.

  • Long pants, pants should be comfortably fitting and made of a sturdy fabric, the thicker and tighter the weave the stronger and more impenetrable to thorns and insects. I suggest the Attack or Tiburon pants as they are great in the warmer weather. Alpine or Chinook pants with lots of pockets are a great functional piece of clothing.
  • Shorts, some hunters are comfortable wearing shorts for hunting in warm climates which is fine but there can be drawbacks. I usually advise against wearing shorts for hunting due to the abundance of sharp thorns, twigs and nasty grass which can be hard on your legs. A pair of shorts for camp or travel may be good to bring if the weather is hot, but the choice to wear them while hunting is yours. The Tiburon Shorts are a super lightweight and breathable short that’s great for hot weather hunting.
  • Shirts, long sleeved shirts for hunting will protect you from the sun and the bush to some degree.
  • T-shirts
  • A light waterproof, breathable jacket, for wind or rain
  • Underwear
  • Sleepwear
  • Casual clothing for relaxing at camp and traveling
  • Swimsuit if it’s a warm time of the year

Cold Weather Clothing

  • Warm jacket or heavy weight fleece
  • Warm wool sweater(s) or mid weight fleece
  • Mid weight long underwear
  • Warm headwear, one that covers your ears can serve a dual purpose
  • Warm gloves

Footwear

  • Hunting boots, you should bring two pairs of well broken-in hunting boots or one pair of hunting boots and one pair of trail shoes. Your footwear should be comfortable, light weight, preferably leather, darker in color and have the advantage of a quiet sole for stalking or tracking.
  • Extra shoe laces for your hunting boots
  • Casual shoes for relaxing in camp and traveling
  • Sandals, for wearing around camp when the weather is suitable
  • Socks, high quality socks are a good idea and will help minimize the risk of blisters.

Accessories

  • Gloves, that are functional for hunting, preferably leather and dark in color. Fingerless gloves used for biking or weightlifting are ideally suited for shooting and reloading and at the same time they will protect you hands if crawling through the bush.
  • Headwear, a suitably colored baseball cap and/or wide brimmed safari hat for added sun protection for your neck and ears.
  • Belt(s)
  • Bandana/Neck Gaiter, a great multi-purpose item, sun protection (head or neck), wet it will cool you off, handkerchieve, dust mask, etc.
  • Gaiters, above the ankle to keep your boots and socks free of nuisances such as sand, prickly seeds and sharp grass or to the knee to offer added protection from nuisances, such as bush, sharp weeds, snakes, etc.

Toiletries

  • Hairbrush/comb
  • Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste
  • Dental floss
  • Q-tips
  • Soap
  • Shampoo
  • Razor and blades
  • Shaving cream (Non-aerosol for carry on)
  • Deodorant (Non-aerosol for carry on)
  • Cologne
  • Moisturizing lotion
  • Nail scissors or clippers
  • Tweezers
  • Lip balm with high SPF
  • Sun block with high SPF, We recommend waterproof sunscreen as it lasts longer. Even if sweating. Depending on the area you are hunting, repellant sunblock is an option but unscented is always a good idea.
  • Ziplock bags, useful and versatile. A good way to contain items that may leak in your luggage.

Travel Accessories

  • Flashlight, we suggest Ledlenser, their brilliant design and easy-use functionality insures great pleasure for your every need.
  • Camera, lenses, flash, a second memory stick, charger and/or extra batteries.
  • Video camera, tapes or memory card/stick, charger and/or extra batteries. Ask your PH to take pictures with his own camera too, it’s a great back up
  • Lens cleaning kit
  • Electric converters
  • Plug adapters

Your Prescription Medication and First Aid

Bruce Watson Safaris has a first aid kit and basic medications are available such as aspirin, ibuprofen, anti-diarrhea pills and band aids.

If you bring prescription medication they should be packed in your carry on luggage and you should have enough to last you through your trip. Your medication must be prescribed in your name and be in their original prescription bottles to avoid problems at customs. If you are carrying liquid medication, be sure to place them in a zip lock bag for airport security.

  • Your regular prescription medications
  • Copies of prescriptions for medications that you are carrying
  • Bee allergy shot or Epipen for those with severe allergies

For your personal needs you may wish to consider bringing some of the following:

  • Treatments for jet lag
  • Insect repellent
  • Itch cream with cortisone
  • Antibiotic cream
  • Moleskin or Band Aid blister block or Band Aid cushions
  • Laxative
  • Antacid
  • Eye drops
  • Motion sickness remedies
  • Decongestant
  • Allergy medication

Personal Items

  • Prescription glasses and/or clear shooting glasses. Theese will help protect your eyes, day or night, against sand, thorns and insects.
  • Sunglasses.
  • Contact lenses and solution if preferred. (Glasses are more practical and provide added protection)
  • Earplugs (for hunting, travel or sleeping)
  • Cell phone and/or satellite phone (Most hunting areas/camps have wifi access and/or local network; check with your telephone service provider to see if your phone has the capability to be activated.)
  • Watch
  • Field guide
  • Shot placement guide, or click here for the App.
  • Small notebook and pen to keep journal or take notes
  • List of addresses or pre-printed mailing labels for sending postcards back home
  • Something to read
  • Reminder list of things that you wanted to do or buy